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Marko Zajc: Slovenian Intellectuals and Yugoslavism in the 1980s. Propositions, Theses, Questions

Marko Zajc
Slovenian Intellectuals and Yugoslavism in the 1980s. Propositions, Theses, Questions
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Zitation
Zajc, Marko (2015): Slovenian Intellectuals and Yugoslavism in the 1980s. Propositions, Theses, Questions. In: Südosteuropäische Hefte 4 (1), S. 46–65.

Abstract
The predominant “story” about the Slovenian nationalism before the collapse of the SFRY is simple: The Slovenian nationalism (negative perception) or “the Slovenian spring” (positive perception) “appeared” in the 1980s, it identified itself as “anti-Yugoslavism” and reached the climax in 1991 with the Slovenian independence. Yet, historical sources – both archival and publicist – expose different story: the relation between Slovenian nationalism and Yugoslavism is much more ambiguous and complicated. Why is the Slovenian Yugoslavism of the 1980s a relevant topic for international com-parative historiography of the second Yugoslavia and its successor states? I would point out two reasons. First, I claim that Yugoslavism of any kind could not exist without Slovenianism, especially since the creation of the first Yugoslavia in 1918. The history of Slovenian Yugoslavism (or Slovenian nationalism in general) is not just relevant for “the Slovenian national historiography”, without “the Slovenian component” we cannot understand Yugoslavia or Yugoslavism in general, which could be understood only in historical context. Although almost all authors recognize the significance of the Slovenian-Serbian conflict for the Yugoslav collapse: they assign surprisingly little attention to Slovenian intellectual circles. They are almost always mentioned, but rarely properly analyzed. Secondly, most of historical analysis is preoccupied with the reasons for the collapse of the Yugoslavia. As H. Grandits and H. Sundhaussen have pointed out, if we research the history of a state that does not exist anymore, we unintentionally “search for” elements of the past, which explain why the state had failed. This is also the reason why Slovenian historians – those who consider the methodology of the academic historiography – are mainly focused on the “processes of independence” or the “processes of democratization”. Slovenian Yugoslavism is not in the spotlight of attention, furthermore, it is mostly seen as an insignificant side-effect of the official Yugoslav ideology of “brotherhood and unity”, not as something genuinely Slovenian.

Persistent Identifier (PID): http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-428352

Đorđe Tomić: All that Folk. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen und Repräsentationen der Folk-Musik im (post-) jugoslawischen Raum

Đorđe Tomić
All that Folk. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen und Repräsentationen der Folk-Musik im (post-) jugoslawischen Raum
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Abstract
By analyzing the broad research of different types of ‘folk’ music in former Yugoslavia, the paper explores the different forms of interpretation and representations created by scholars in social science and humanities. Tracing back their critique of this music into the socialist period, the analysis offers new insights into the motives and ways of producing meaning by one part of the intellectual elite – for Serbia framed as the ‘second/ other Serbia’ – in the context of political transformation at the end of the 20th century in this region. While hardly any of the analyzed scholarly works on (‘folk’) music was really about music, being instead quite often mainly concerned with its alleged symbolical meaning, most of them used ‘folk’ as a catchy ‘label’ that introduced further analysis of society and/or politics in former Yugoslavia during the 1990s. By criticizing the ‘kitsch’ of ‘folk’ and, at the same time, presenting more or less sophisticated scientific findings on correlations between ‘folk’ and politics, the authors of the works analyzed in this paper mostly underlined their distance to this ‘genre’, thus pointing out their (oppositional) political standpoint, and, especially, by delegitimizing the ‘folk culture’ on the one hand and the new nationalist political setting on the other, they aimed to compensate the loss of cultural capital they used to or – from their perspective – ought to have as representatives of some kind of intellectual vanguard.

Zitation
Tomić, Đorđe (2014): All that Folk. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen und Repräsentationen der Folk-Musik im (post-) jugoslawischen Raum. In: Südosteuropäische Hefte 3 (1), S. 131–162.

Persistent Identifier (PID): http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-398529