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Đorđe Tomić & Stefan Pavleski: Das werktätige Volk ohne Arbeit

Đorđe Tomić & Stefan Pavleski
Das werktätige Volk ohne Arbeit. Arbeitslosigkeit und Selbstverwaltung im sozialistischen Jugoslawien als Forschungsgegenstand: Eine kritische Bestandsaufnahme
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Abstract
The article focuses on the question of a possible linkage between unemployment and self-management in socialist Yugoslavia. Departing from secondary sources and offering a critical literature review, the article sketches the development of unemployment in Yugoslavia from the 1950s to the beginning of the 1980s, outlines different points of discussion and explores concrete gaps in the existing interpretations. By proposing a differentiated view of self-management, the authors conclude that from an economic perspective the relationship between self-management and unemployment was at best an indirect one. The broader system of self-management can hardly be interpreted as an obstacle to political participation or social integration of unemployed persons. In contrast to previous interpretations of Yugoslavia’s unemployment which regard it as a paradox, the authors suggest that the paradox was not the existence of unemployment in a socialist state, but the way in which the society – especially when organized on the basis of socialist self-management – reacted to it. In fact, the Yugoslav response to the problem of unemployment proved to be not really different from the way this was handled by other (capitalist) states in this period.

Zitation
Tomić, Đorđe; Pavleski, Stefan (2015): Das werktätige Volk ohne Arbeit. Arbeitslosigkeit und Selbstverwaltung im sozialistischen Jugoslawien als Forschungsgegenstand: Eine kritische Bestandsaufnahme. In: Südosteuropäische Hefte 4 (2), S. 73–90.

Persistent Identifier (PID): http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-454523

Marko Zajc: Slovenian Intellectuals and Yugoslavism in the 1980s. Propositions, Theses, Questions

Marko Zajc
Slovenian Intellectuals and Yugoslavism in the 1980s. Propositions, Theses, Questions
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Zitation
Zajc, Marko (2015): Slovenian Intellectuals and Yugoslavism in the 1980s. Propositions, Theses, Questions. In: Südosteuropäische Hefte 4 (1), S. 46–65.

Abstract
The predominant “story” about the Slovenian nationalism before the collapse of the SFRY is simple: The Slovenian nationalism (negative perception) or “the Slovenian spring” (positive perception) “appeared” in the 1980s, it identified itself as “anti-Yugoslavism” and reached the climax in 1991 with the Slovenian independence. Yet, historical sources – both archival and publicist – expose different story: the relation between Slovenian nationalism and Yugoslavism is much more ambiguous and complicated. Why is the Slovenian Yugoslavism of the 1980s a relevant topic for international com-parative historiography of the second Yugoslavia and its successor states? I would point out two reasons. First, I claim that Yugoslavism of any kind could not exist without Slovenianism, especially since the creation of the first Yugoslavia in 1918. The history of Slovenian Yugoslavism (or Slovenian nationalism in general) is not just relevant for “the Slovenian national historiography”, without “the Slovenian component” we cannot understand Yugoslavia or Yugoslavism in general, which could be understood only in historical context. Although almost all authors recognize the significance of the Slovenian-Serbian conflict for the Yugoslav collapse: they assign surprisingly little attention to Slovenian intellectual circles. They are almost always mentioned, but rarely properly analyzed. Secondly, most of historical analysis is preoccupied with the reasons for the collapse of the Yugoslavia. As H. Grandits and H. Sundhaussen have pointed out, if we research the history of a state that does not exist anymore, we unintentionally “search for” elements of the past, which explain why the state had failed. This is also the reason why Slovenian historians – those who consider the methodology of the academic historiography – are mainly focused on the “processes of independence” or the “processes of democratization”. Slovenian Yugoslavism is not in the spotlight of attention, furthermore, it is mostly seen as an insignificant side-effect of the official Yugoslav ideology of “brotherhood and unity”, not as something genuinely Slovenian.

Persistent Identifier (PID): http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-428352